Overview

Being physically active offers well-recognized benefits to physical and mental health. Competitive sports for people with disabilities has grown rapidly over the past several decades, and opportunities for participation are increasingly available throughout the spectrum from grassroots to elite sports. There is evidence of the power of sports to stimulate confidence, self-efficacy, and a self-perceived high quality of life for individuals with disabilities above and beyond the basic benefits to cardiometabolic fitness. When taken together, the promotion of health, disability rights, and social integration through sports has the power to transform the lives of those who participate and to further stimulate the expansion of opportunities available to the next generation of athletes with disabilities. This lecture will emphasize the importance of engaging all people with an impairment, from grassroots up through elite, in sport as a means of promoting population health.

Speakers

Cheri Blauwet, MD

Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Harvard Medical School
Attending Physician – Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts
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Accreditation

CME

The University of Kentucky College of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Kentucky College of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The University of Kentucky College of Medicine presents this activity for educational purposes only. Participants are expected to utilize their own expertise and judgment while engaged in the practice of medicine. The content of the presentations is provided solely by presenters who have been selected for presentations because of recognized expertise in their field.

ACGME Competencies

  • Patient care
  • Medical knowledge